6.2 Lifter Failure Poll

Have you experienced the dreaded 6.2 lifter failure?

  • Yes - Dreaded Failure Lottery Won

    Votes: 7 6.9%
  • No - Lifter Bullet Dodged So Far

    Votes: 95 93.1%

  • Total voters
    102

HuntRedi

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For the benefit of forum members and those internet researchers, if you have experienced the dreaded lifter failure please post details after voting (I.e. model year, vin, production date, mileage at failure, etc)

You can update your vote IF you unfortunately win this lottery after your initial vote.
 
2022 model year, production date was August 2022.

NO lifter failure @ 15000+ miles to date

Mix of city and highway driving. I run a mix of 87 and 91. Borla muffler, mainly drive L9 to stop the AFM/DFM drone and tone changes.
 
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Mine was built the same time August 2022. I only have 1200 miles, cause I just bought it. Of course, no lifter failures so far.

I like my odds!
 
First truck was 2022 ZR2 (VIN 3GCUDHEL4NG573817) Built 04/22 *I think* traded-in at 8.5k miles with no issues - current owner also a forum member.
Second truck is 2022 ZR2 (VIN 3GCUDHEL0NG657746) Built 08/22 1.5k miles and so far so good.
 
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2022 model year, production date was August 2022.

NO lifter failure @ 10,500 miles to date

First oil change was at Chevy dealer a few hundred after it dinged and told me to change it…

Mix of city and highway driving. I run a mix of 87 and 91, put a truck size can of SeaFoam in every 2-3 weeks or so. My wife drove it the first few thousand, she just ran straight Drive mode. I have always run it in L9.
Where can I find my production date?
 

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2022 model year, production date was August 2022.

NO lifter failure @ 10,500 miles to date

First oil change was at Chevy dealer a few hundred after it dinged and told me to change it…

Mix of city and highway driving. I run a mix of 87 and 91, put a truck size can of SeaFoam in every 2-3 weeks or so. My wife drove it the first few thousand, she just ran straight Drive mode. I have always run it in
2022 model year, production date was August 2022.

NO lifter failure @ 10,500 miles to date

First oil change was at Chevy dealer a few hundred after it dinged and told me to change it…

Mix of city and highway driving. I run a mix of 87 and 91, put a truck size can of SeaFoam in every 2-3 weeks or so. My wife drove it the first few thousand, she just ran straight Drive mode. I have always run it in L9.
Are there any risks/drawbacks to using Seafoam? Are you using the fuel treatment or adding it to your oil change?
 
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Are there any risks/drawbacks to using Seafoam? Are you using the fuel treatment or adding it to your oil change?
My family has used barrels of Sea Foam and Essential Lube in farm equipment, construction equipment, vehicles, boats, generators, etc for 50+ years. It works really good, especially in older vehicles. It also works well if your fuel has a lot of ethanol that will break down quickly.

If your driving your ZR2 a lot and fuel is turning over quickly you may not see much benefit. However, it will help keep your throttle body, fuel system, and valves/cylinder a little cleaner. Modern fuels have a lot of additives, but they ain't perfect.

I dump a 16 oz can in my fuel tank every 3k or so. Sure as hell won't harm it!
 
My family has used barrels of Sea Foam and Essential Lube in farm equipment, construction equipment, vehicles, boats, generators, etc for 50+ years. It works really good, especially in older vehicles. It also works well if your fuel has a lot of ethanol that will break down quickly.

If your driving your ZR2 a lot and fuel is turning over quickly you may not see much benefit. However, it will help keep your throttle body, fuel system, and valves/cylinder a little cleaner. Modern fuels have a lot of additives, but they ain't perfect.

I dump a 16 oz can in my fuel tank every 3k or so. Sure as hell won't harm it!
Is the 6.2L not a DI engine??? If it is, then there is no fuel wash over the valves which means it does nothing for the valves which is where the problems occur.
 
My family has used barrels of Sea Foam and Essential Lube in farm equipment, construction equipment, vehicles, boats, generators, etc for 50+ years. It works really good, especially in older vehicles. It also works well if your fuel has a lot of ethanol that will break down quickly.

If your driving your ZR2 a lot and fuel is turning over quickly you may not see much benefit. However, it will help keep your throttle body, fuel system, and valves/cylinder a little cleaner. Modern fuels have a lot of additives, but they ain't perfect.

I dump a 16 oz can in my fuel tank every 3k or so. Sure as hell won't harm it!
i don’t proclaim to be an expert on most topics posted across this forum but essentially the above is my logic, fwiw.

You might check out this video. It’s at least interesting…a new ZR2 isn’t the same as his project truck, as already stated, but I argue it won’t hurt as well.


You never know what you might post as a side comment that will trigger wisdom to be dropped and debates to ensue 😅.
 
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Is the 6.2L not a DI engine??? If it is, then there is no fuel wash over the valves which means it does nothing for the valves which is where the problems occur.
Correct. Sea foam applied in the tank will only effect the fuel system itself and the combustion chamber.

Pulling a vacuum line and feeding it directly into the intake manifold will clean the runners and top of the intake valves along with the combustion chamber.

All of the sea foam “smoke bomb” videos are done this way. And it’s the correct way to foam a vehicle. It’s quite comical actually.
 

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Always helpful when your dad is a mechanic. So it sounds like there's little downside to the occasional sea foam, but different results based on the application method, and injection type on the vehicle.

When Sea Foam is added to the fuel tank, it is mixed with the fuel and then drawn into the engine through the fuel system. As the Sea Foam travels through the engine, it can clean and lubricate various components, including fuel injectors, carburetors, and valves. It can also help to remove carbon deposits and other contaminants from the engine.

When Sea Foam is vacuum fed directly into the intake manifold, it bypasses the fuel system and goes directly into the engine's combustion chamber. This can provide more direct cleaning of the engine's internal components, such as the valves, pistons, and cylinder heads. By cleaning these components more thoroughly, vacuum feeding Sea Foam can potentially provide greater improvements in engine performance and fuel efficiency than adding it to the fuel tank.

Interestingly, the L87 is direct injection and my understanding is that there are some differences in how Sea Foam may affect direct injection engines versus port fuel injection engines. In direct injection engines, fuel is sprayed directly into the combustion chamber under high pressure, which can lead to a greater buildup of carbon deposits on the engine's intake valves. This can result in reduced engine performance, increased fuel consumption, and other issues.

Sea Foam can help to address this problem by cleaning the intake valves and removing carbon buildup, which can help to restore engine performance and fuel efficiency in direct injection engines. However, because direct injection engines are more prone to carbon buildup on the intake valves, it may be necessary to use Sea Foam more frequently or in higher concentrations to achieve the desired results.

What I'm wondering is, how frequently and what concentration - does the product come with general guidelines, or do they have specific instructions by engine/mfg?

I've read that direct intake can potentially damage engine components, if not properly diluted. As it relates to the risks, it sounds like the older the direct injection engine (or higher mileage), the more likely it is for the sea foam to dislodge larger carbon deposits or more debris that can then clog filters or other parts of the fuel system. All damage scenarios are generally seen as low risk though.

 

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